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Medieval jewellery found after field was ploughed

By Burton Mail  |  Posted: June 30, 2014

  • DEac20140626B-1533_X.jpg SCANS A MEDIAEVAL gold ring and a pendant found in a South Derbyshire field could soon be on show to the public. The finds by a local metal-detectorist, Philip Jackson, have been requested by the Derby Museum and Art Gallery so

  • DEac20140626B-1532_X.jpg SCANS A MEDIAEVAL gold ring and a pendant found in a South Derbyshire field could soon be on show to the public. The finds by a local metal-detectorist, Philip Jackson, have been requested by the Derby Museum and Art Gallery so

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A MEDIEVAL gold ring, along with a silver pendant, found in a South Derbyshire field could go on show to the public.

The finds by metal detectorist Philip Jackson could be staying in the county after the Derby Museum and Art Gallery expressed an interest in them.

A treasure inquest at Derby and South Derbyshire Coroner’s Court heard that the rings had been found in a ploughed field.

They were handed to the finds liaison officer, who deals with items found by metal detectorists in the county.

The pair were then sent to the British Museum, where a committee decides upon the value.

The British Museum may express an interest in buying the pieces – or it is possible for another museum to request to display them.

Any money from the sale is then split between the landowner and the finder.

The medieval silver pendant has a re-used Roman intaglio in its centre.

The intaglio, an engraved oval gem, was used by a craftsman between 1200 and 1350 to form the centre piece of the pendant. The charm was designed to protect the wearer from various ailments and misfortunes.

The nude figure is holding a patera – a Roman drinking vessel – in one hand while, in the other, there is what is believed to be some ears of corn.

The gold ring is dated to around the 13th or 14th centuries and was found during the same dig, in April last year, but not at the same time.

Spencer Bailey, collections manager at Derby Museum and Art Gallery, said: “We have expressed an interest in the finds.”

Deputy Coroner Paul McCandless found that both items should be declared as treasure as both were found to be made of more than 10 per cent precious metals and were 300 years or more old.

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