Derbyshire County Council is set to spend £10 extra on every GCSE-age pupil this year.

Basic spending for every pupil in Derbyshire is set to rise with the new funding formula from £4,375 to £4,385 per GCSE-age pupil per year.

The increased spending varies drastically between different year groups, with younger pupils set to see a higher rise in money spent on each of them per year.

However, they continue to have less in total spent on each of them than older students.

In Key Stage 1, kids aged five to seven, and Key Stage 2, children aged seven to 11, basic funding is set to rise by £98 per pupil this year to £2,746.

Meanwhile, in Key Stage 3, pupils aged 11 to 14, every child will be set aside an extra £128 from the county council's basic funding pot making for a total of £3,862.

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However, Key Stage 4 students, those studying their GCSES and aged 16 to 18, the basic spend per pupil will rise by £10 to £4,385.

Each of these categories will be rounded up to higher minimum spends under the Government's new funding formula, through additional needs spending and money from the schools themselves.

School funding is set to get a boost, but statistics show that some pupils are to benefit more than others
School funding is set to get a boost, but statistics show that some pupils are to benefit more than others

These figures will differ across the country and may rely how many pupils receive free school meals or live in a deprived area.

Under the new rules Key Stage 1 and 2 pupils will receive at least £3,500 while Key Stage 3 and 4 students will be set aside £4,800.

Here are the total basic needs and overall spends per age category:

Key Stage 1 & 2 (age 5-7 and 7-11):

  • Basic - £163,569,520 (£163 million)
  • Overall - £234,281,081 (£234 million)

Key Stage 3 (age 11-14):

  • Basic - £89,513,051 (£89 million)

Key Stage 4 (age 14-16):

  • Basic - £63,238,994 (£63 million)

Overall spending for KS3 and KS4 are merged into one pot - a total of £192,804,477 (£192 million).

County council cabinet member for young people, Councillor Alex Dale said that there will be an overall increase in funding for schools in the Derbyshire, but some will see their allocations drop.

Derbyshire County Council cabinet member for young people councillor, Alex Dale
Derbyshire County Council cabinet member for young people councillor, Alex Dale

He said: "The National Funding Formula represents a significant change to the way all schools are financially supported in future.

"The Government has made it clear it wants greater transparency in schools funding and to make it easier for schools to calculate the amount of money they will get in future years, and the council supports those principles.

"There will be more money for schools in remote locations and support for pupils with lower levels of attainment.

"There will be an increase in the overall funding for schools in Derbyshire, which is welcome, but due to the formula changes some schools will see their allocation reduce slightly.

"Over the next two years, councils will remain responsible for allocating the funding from Government to schools.

"We will help our schools adjust to the new system by allocating that funding as closely as possible to the formula.

"While it is a more transparent system, it may still appear to be quite complex at first.

"Therefore, the council will work with our schools to advise and help them to make the best possible use of every penny they get."

In a report compiled for county councillors, officers wrote that the transition to the new funding formula will be capped at a three per cent rise per pupil for the years 2018 to 2019 and 2019 to 2020.

The change in funding formula for schools is a bid from the Government to end the "unfair postcode lottery".

It has given an added £1.3 billion which has been split between the country's local authorities, including Derbyshire County Council.

Each school must be given a set amount of money per pupil, depending on the child's age, but the amount over these set limits can vary.

Every school should see a cash increase.

The first £416 million is being handed out this year, with the remaining £884 million being dished out in 2019 to 2020.

Essentially, for the first two years, the funding will go to local authorities to then review and distribute based on their own factors.

Paul Whiteman, the general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers, has also expressed disappointment that the opportunity to "ensure that the funding goes directly to schools based on their need" has been missed.

Mr Whiteman said this presented a "real risk that" that it could "perpetuate some of the inconsistencies this was intended to address".

However, a website which has compiled all the funding cuts which schools in Derbyshire have faced, based on official figures, shows that 352 of 395 in the county will face cuts.

As a result of funding changes, including the latest batch, Derbyshire pupils are set to lose £175 each
As a result of funding changes, including the latest batch, Derbyshire pupils are set to lose £175 each

Overall Derbyshire schools will see a loss of £16.9 million by 2020, which adds up to £175 less per pupil and 318 fewer teachers.

The now former Education Secretary, Justine Greening, said that the extra funding should help "continue to raise standards and give every child the best possible education".

She said in July last year, when the plans were launched: "Fairer schools funding – backed by today's additional investment – will deliver the biggest improvement to the school funding system for well over a decade.

"It will mean an increase in the basic amount that every pupil will get, protected funding for those with high needs and will ensure every local authority is in a position to give schools a cash increase through the new formula.

"This means that, with teachers and schools across the country, we can continue to raise standards and give every child the best possible education, and the best opportunities for the future."