Our 'Top of the pots' of the worst potholes in the Burton and Swadlincote area has prompted lots of you to get in touch and tell us about other contenders for the list of shame.

We selected a top 10 of the worst potholes out there and since, you have been getting in touch with your suggestions.

A garage boss has even said there are so many holes in the roads in the areas that "there's no real way to avoid", saying they are among the most common causes of damage to cars in the area.

Stuart Watson, has been the assistant manager at Crescent Motors in Wetmore Road, Burton, for three years and says that several times a week he sees cars with front or rear coil springs damage caused by a pothole.

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He says that there are sometimes several drivers a day bringing in their cars for repairs caused by pothole damage, with a front or real coil spring costing upwards of £100 depending on the make and model of the vehicle.

Stuart told the Burton Mail: "There are quite a few cars each week and sometimes in a day which come in with coil spring damage caused by potholes and speed bumps.

"You could be looking at £100 or £150 to fix a broken coil spring, depending on the car and the front coil is always worse and takes more to mend. It's a regular occurrence, it's quite common for us.

"The only advice is that people try to slow down, because driving into them with less force should help, and where possible go around the potholes.

"But you can't go around town swerving left and right all the time to avoid them; all you can do is try and keep your eyes peeled and do your best.

"There's no real way to avoid them because there are just so many."

Following on from our previous top 10 potholes in Burton and South Derbyshire we asked our readers for more recommendations.

Here is a fresh list of problematic blights to our roads:

1. Alma Road in Newhall - top of our list, you'll need a couple oars for this one!

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Alma Road in Newhall
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Alma Road in Newhall

You're going to need a bigger car. That is no pothole - it's being a lake! Put out your oars, find your paddle, there's a new public swimming pool over in Newhall, say locals.

This pothole stretches past six foot in length and contains standing water, and it's growing by the day - definitely one to avoid.

This monster is not the only pothole present in Alma Road, it is followed by many more smaller but still troublesome ruts for motorists.

2. Aviation Lane, Burton

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Aviation Lane, Burton
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Aviation Lane, Burton

This rut is growing deeper by the day and is big enough to prove a real problem for a small car tyre, and due to its position on the road it is becoming more and more of a hazard.

Best to pull over and wait if there is a car coming the opposite way - not worth the risk of trying to get through it.

3. Junction of High Street and Worthington Way, Burton

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Junction of High Street and Worthington Way
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Junction of High Street and Worthington Way

This tricky customer is unavoidable due to its positioning in the road and has become a nuisance to Burton motorists.

It is in an area of consistently busy traffic and is worsening week by week, you say, particularly through the recent freezing temperatures.

As you turn turn right into Worthington Way, there's little chance of avoiding this one.

4. Brackenwood Road, Stapenhill

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Brackenwood Road, Stapenhill
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Brackenwood Road, Stapenhill

This one is really three potholes that are gradually joining up so it makes it difficult for drivers to get through without dropping in it at some point.

There is also lots of loose Tarmac from the holes now on the kerb and pavement. Go slowly over this one.

5. Junction Of Rosliston Road and Birchfield Road, Stapenhill

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured:Junction Of Rosliston Road and Birchfield Road, Stapenhill
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured:Junction Of Rosliston Road and Birchfield Road, Stapenhill

You will most certainly know you have reached this junction as your car drops into this long hole that straddles the area.

Tiptoe over this one as you turn.

6. Under bridge near the National Brewery Centre, Horninglow Street, Burton

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Junction of Horninglow Road and Hawkins Lane
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Junction of Horninglow Road and Hawkins Lane

This pothole is getting deeper and deeper, though still perhaps not wide enough to eat larger car tyres.

Vehicles are having to swerve to bypass this pesky pothole which sits square in the middle of possibly one of the busiest junctions in Burton town centre.

This one has been an issue in the past - looks like its back.

7. Junction with Union Street and New Street, Burton

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Junction of New Street and Union Street
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Junction of New Street and Union Street

Among the pesky potholes in the centre of Burton, this one is definitely worsening due to the particularly harsh ice and rain in recent months.

It runs right across a busy junction, although narrow and partly disjointed it is sure to cause disruption.

Make sure you don't miss this one on the dark nights as your go drive through the box junction.

8. High Street, Burton

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Junction of High Street and New Street
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Junction of High Street and New Street

This pothole, near Cafe Zen close to New Street, is very large but shallow, with just two small pockets of water for now, but if the cold conditions continue to worsen it is sure to become a beast.

Keep an eye out if you're going this way.

9. Short Street, Stapenhill

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Short Street in Stapenhill
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Short Street in Stapenhill

These two potholes sit either side of a manhole and could cause problems for motorists in the area.

It has created almost a triple speedbump and is going to be one to watch in the months to come.

These aren't the only pothole in the street, further along the road towards McColls, there are many, many more.

10. Near Sainsbury's, Horninglow Street, Burton

Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Horninglow Road, Burton
Picture: Simon Deacon Pot holes around Burton and Swadlincote Pictured: Horninglow Road, Burton

It runs right down the middle of the road, and like the other town centre blights, it is worsening due to heavy traffic in the busy area.

This type of pothole is one which seems to be growing along roads across Burton and South Derbyshire, splitting the centreline of the road near junctions and deepening, but remaining narrow.

Potholes are caused when moisture gets into the cracks in the road which then expands when it freezes.

The holes get bigger as vehicles drive over them damaging the structure of the road below its surface layer.

Repeated freeze-thaw and wet-dry cycles make the pothole situation much worse.

The RAC believes the rise in potholes across the UK has stemmed from many cash-strapped councils' reactive "patch and dash" approach which means rather than resurfacing roads properly, potholes are repaired individually in a hurry, and sometimes in wet weather, leading to them quickly breaking down and reappearing.

One of the near 50 potholes in Buckford Lane, Stenson, which caused £1,200 of damage to a BMW driver's wheel in September
One of the near 50 potholes in Buckford Lane, Stenson, which caused £1,200 of damage to a BMW driver's wheel in September

Common causes of damage from potholes include:

  • Buckled wheels
  • Cracked wheels
  • Lumps in the tyre
  • Cracked alloys
  • Knocked-out tracking
  • Wheel imbalance

Breakdown cover and car insurance company the RAC has issued 11 pieces of advice for drivers when encountering potholes - chief among them are keeping your eyes peeled and maintaining your distance from the vehicle infront of you.

The advice is:

  1. Keep your eyes peeled - Protect yourself and your car by keeping an eye out for potholes and watching your speed, particularly in wet weather when deep potholes may be hidden beneath puddles.
  2. Maintain your distance - Leave plenty of distance between your car and the vehicle in front so you can see potholes in advance.
  3. Stay alert - Be aware of other traffic or pedestrians on the road before changing course to avoid a pothole.
  4. Watch your speed - Striking potholes at higher speeds can cause more damage to your vehicle.
  5. Avoid unnecessary braking – Try not to apply your brakes when driving over a pothole. When you brake you tilt the vehicle forward placing more stress on the front suspension.
  6. Drive over potholes with care - If you have to drive over a pothole, allow the wheel to roll freely into the hole.
  7. Hold the steering wheel correctly - Make sure you are holding the steering wheel properly – "10 to 2" hands position – when driving on a road with potholes – failure to do so may mean you lose control of your vehicle.
  8. Recovering lost parts - If your vehicle sustains damage while travelling, such as a lost hubcap, ensure you stop in a safe location before attempting to recover it.
  9. Safety first - If you wish to inspect any damage to your car, ensure that you stop in a safe place.
  10. Get checked out - If you have hit a pothole and suspect your car has sustained damage, we recommend you get the vehicle checked out by your local garage. Ask them to verify if there could be any other issues such as problems with tracking and wheel alignment, tyres or suspension.
  11. Check tyre pressure regularly –checking your tyre pressure regularly to ensure safety as a line of defence against potholes. Recommended tyre pressures can be found in your vehicle's handbook and on the label located inside the driver’s side door frame or door post.

Potholes can be reported to Derbyshire County Council here or Staffordshire County Council here.

But what are our councils doing about it?

In the past year more than 31,000 potholes have been repaired by Staffordshire County Council.

On average its staff 20,000 potholes a year, the rise in repairs comes as the county council invested a further £5 million into improving Staffordshire's road network - an addition to the already approved £35 million transport schemes.

A county council spokesman said that a combination of traditional gangs repairing potholes, plus use of the three new pothole 'zapping' machines has meant more than 2,500 defects are being repaired on average every month.

Motorists happy with repairs to road near Burton dubbed the worst in the country because of its potholes

County councillor Helen Fisher, cabinet support member for highways and transport at the authority said tackling the pothole problem in the county was always going to be an issue to its sheer size.

She said: "Good roads are important to communities, but in a county the size of Staffordshire tackling potholes is always going to be a challenge.

"The extra £5 million investment has helped crews tackle more repairs and reduce the backlog.

A £1.5 million fund to repair potholes in Derbyshire was unveiled in December - with 13,000 holes identified on crumbling roads throughout the county.

The pothole clampdown is part of plans by Derbyshire County Council to fork out £23.5 million on proposals to improve road and transport links in the county.

This breaks down to £16.9 million on roads maintenance, £3.6 million on transport, £1.5 million on fixing highways, and the £1.5 million outlay on potholes.

County council officers said the improvements could prevent casualties from road collisions and have a "long-term social value to the community".