Spades are now in the ground as developers start work on a controversial housing estate which nearly 150 people have objected to.

David Wilson Homes has started building 85 properties in Doveridge after gaining permission for the development, off Derby Road, last summer.

Dubbed Doveridge Park, once completed, the development will feature a range of one-bedroom to five-bedroom homes, set in green open space, mature woodland and rolling farmland.

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Planning authority Derbyshire Dales District Council granted permission for the development despite receiving 147 letters of objection, including one from Doveridge Preservation Society, which claimed the land was a "key heritage asset".

Other objectors feel the village is in danger of becoming overdeveloped, have questioned the need for additional housing and warned of an adverse impact on the community.

However, the district council felt that the development was necessary in order to meet the housing needs in the area.

A condition of the development is that David Wilson Homes contribute almost £1 million to the area via a section 106 agreement with the district council.

This will be used to support services and improve facilities for new and existing residents of the village.

Jason Hearn, sales director at David Wilson Homes East Midlands, said: "We’re very excited to be starting work at Doveridge Park.

The development will begin to take shape over the following months and we are delighted to be adding high quality homes to this part of Derbyshire.

"We will be contributing to Derbyshire through the jobs we create for local people, the quality homes we build and our investment in the community."

David Wilson Homes is also behind the Hazelwalls Farm development in Uttoxeter, which is being built on fields off Timber Lane.

More than 300 objectors made their feelings known to planners at East Staffordshire Borough Council on this scheme.

But despite concerns about flooding, road congestion and the environment, the planning committee gave the 429-home development the green light.